Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

When it comes to countertop materials, granite may be the most popular choice for homeowners, but quartz is a close second. Quartz countertops consist of about 93 percent crushed quartz (an abundant mineral) and seven percent polymer resin, making quartz an engineered stone. Because it’s engineered, manufacturers can mix a variety of colors into quartz, creating a wide range of countertop color options. Although quartz is heavier than granite, it’s more flexible and easier to install. SEARCH THE LIST: Ready to upgrade your countertops? Search Angie’s List to find a coutertop installation company near you.
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Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

Pros of quartz countertops?Quartz countertops are durable and non-porous, so there’s no need to apply a protective sealant. The countertops also resist stains, scratches and heat. Quartz countertops are ideal for someone looking for uniform color. If part of the countertop is damaged, finding a matching replacement is possible. Quartz doesn’t require any special care; just wipe with mild dish soap and water.
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Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

Quartz: Quartz countertops are manufactured. They might look natural (that’s the point), but the truth is that quartz is crushed and traditionally mixed with resin or another binding agent. The patters and colors that appear in quartz countertops are 100% artificial. The quartz itself is real, of course, but everything else was designed by a human being (as opposed to mother nature).
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Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

Quartz countertops consist of about 93 percent crushed quartz (an abundant mineral) and seven percent polymer resin, making quartz an engineered stone. Because it’s engineered, manufacturers can mix a variety of colors into quartz, creating a wide range of countertop color options. Although quartz is heavier than granite, it’s more flexible and easier to install.
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Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

In the process of making quartz slabs, quartz crystals of various sizes are blended in with binding agents and pigment to create a fabricated stone. Then the manufacturer cuts slabs from the stone, treating the edges and giving the slab a glossy finish. Although it is possible to buy natural quartz for fabricating surfaces, quartz countertops are typically referred to as “engineered quartz” due to the blending process.
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Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

Quartz and granite are relative equals when it comes to which one chips easier, but quartz tends to be considered stronger because it is more flexible. Granite that is not installed properly or that received tremendous weight strain is more liable to crack than quartz. On the other hand, quartz is even heavier than granite, and that’s saying something. Both granite and quartz need to be professionally installed, they’re simply too heavy and unwieldy for the average amateur.
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Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

Quartz countertops are durable and non-porous, so there’s no need to apply a protective sealant. The countertops also resist stains, scratches and heat. Quartz countertops are ideal for someone looking for uniform color. If part of the countertop is damaged, finding a matching replacement is possible. Quartz doesn’t require any special care; just wipe with mild dish soap and water.
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Quartz Kitchen Countertops Cost

If you go with quartz for your countertops, you can be certain you have made the right choice. It may seem that the cost of quartz countertops is too much, but in reality, it all depends on the surface on which you are installing them. Moreover, the quartz’s high level of durability ensures that the countertop will be with you for a long time.
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When creating engineered quartz, a manufacturer mixes about 93 percent ground natural quartz with about 7 percent polymer resins to create a hybrid material. The resulting product is not only low-maintenance and very tough, it has the natural stone look that many homeowners love about quartz. In recent years, engineered quartz has become a popular alternative to granite due to how durable the resulting slab is, as well as how easy it is to customize its color with pigments.
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Due to the low heat resistance of quartz countertops, never place hot pans or skillets directly onto the counters. Avoid damage from hot cooking utensils or heated appliances by using hot pads and trivets while cooking in the kitchen. If there are quartz countertops installed in the bathroom, remember never to place heated hair appliances like straighteners or curlers directly on the surface of the countertops.
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I am a Kitchen Designer slash “Salesperson” (I guess) but I’m too honest to want to call myself a salesperson. I don’t throw a sales pitch ever. I give honest information and pricing and let the customer make an informed choice -whether it’s with us or another company. That being said, in our area (central New York state) no one that’s qualified should give you a price that doesn’t include installation, ie. measuring for the new top, putting in new top, seaming, leveling the new top, attaching the sink to the top, making all your cutouts, polishing all edges that are exposed, installing ctop-material backsplash, and a professional 15 yr sealer on granite materials. What’s usually not included? Taking out the old top, hooking or unhooking any plumbing lines, fixing small scuffs on walls when fitting a top between two walls. What do I tell people to and not to do? Don’t look at square foot pricing. Sink cutouts, edging, backsplash, wasted material isn’t included in that square foot price. Instead, ask for the final price when the installers have left. What’s the exact end price? Compare that price. DO look at slabs in person. I’m talking 5’x8′ slabs. Not the samples in the showroom. What you see in the showroom is a sample and your big island might not look exactly like that. You’re paying thousands for this to be an everyday part of your house. Invest the time to see and pick your slabs. Doesn’t matter if it’s granite or quartz. Do ask an unbiased professional. Not your neighbor, not Cousin Vinny who is a roofing contractor, not the guy who only installs granite, nor the guy who only installs quartz. And NOT HGTV or the internet. (Ironic that I’m saying this on the internet.) Too many times do I get people that tell me they will not look at granite because it’s high maintenance, or they want Corian because it doesn’t stain. I won’t tell you what I know know of their differences because it varies by region. Everyone we use, for example, uses a 15 yr sealer on their granite. That might not be the case near you. Do consider laminate. If your budget won’t allow granite or quartz, consider it. It’s come a long way. Do listen to word-of-mouth referrals. Usually the contractors or fabricators that are the best, don’t need to advertise or put themselves on someplace like Angie’s List or Porch.Com or on Craigslist. They are perfectly busy by word of mouth recommendations And you’ll probably have to wait longer for their availability. There’s a reason they’re booked. Do ask your local lumber yard or home improvement store for recommendations if you haven’t heard of any contractors or fabricators. They know who they see all the time and have a good idea of who’s good and bad by what materials they buy, and how happy their customers are. Or. If you want someone cheap who might no do the best job, they con probably steer you in the right direction there, too. Don’t give 3rd chances. If someone doesn’t respond to your calls or emails, don’t go there. Repeat. Do not go there. What happens if that person finally does return your call, gets into the job, and there’s a problem and he stops answering? Don’t put yourself in a situation where you wish you recognized the signs. You’ll pay more to have someone come in and finish even if there were no problems. Going back to my previous point… the guy that doesn’t advertise works hard for the good recommendation. He’ll probably work hardest to make sure you’re happy. Do ask what you should expect along the way. What’s the whole process in detail. Don’t forget to ask about how they go about solving problems. What if your ctop has a crack in it from day one? What if a backsplash was forgotten? How do they fix these issues and how long does that take? Do ask about the warranty. Is there one? What does it cover? You might be surprised that chips or stains or cracks might not be covered. Do tell your friendly professional how you plan to use your countertop. Do you entertain a lot? Do you have kids? Do you only make coffee in the morning and eat out every night? I should reiterate: obtain as much information as possible. Do not use the Internet for your main source of information. Talk to an unbiased professional or two and go from there. Make an informed decision. Don’t use marble because HGTV did it on a show and it looks great. The professional will probably be holding back giggles because you don’t even realize that marble stains and etches So easy. I almost forgot… Do bring samples. Flooring, cabinetry, paint, tile, hardware. It all comes into play. Even if you’re going to re-do your floor in a year, start thinking about it now. You don’t have to do everything at once but definitely plan it out as much as you can. Don’t match a new ctop to your old floor you’re changing soon. And don’t ignore it altogether either. If you want a grey ctop, maybe the beige floor you thought you liked clashes really bad. When that happens… Do go with what you love. Pick the material choice you love the most and make everything work around that. If you end up with 3 things you only kinda like, you probably won’t be happy still in 3 years. Do ask for opinions. I’ll tell you once. Contrast is good. Dark and light make ordinary look extraordinary. Beige plus beige plus light beige plus more beige looks blah, no matter how much it cost. (Beige is just an example. I don’t mean to pick on beige.) Beige might look better with a dark color with a little gold in it and voila! Instant beautification! Ask everyone that has a good eye what they think. Referring back… do go with what YOU love. In the end, it’s your home. Pick what you’ll love to see and maintain every day. (Who cares what Cousin Vinny thinks? You only see him on holidays anyways.)

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