Granny Pods Floor Plans

Granny Pods Floor Plans

Granny Units Granny Units, also called In-Law Units, usually have a small living/kitchen, bathroom, and bedroom. Our granny unit plans are separate structures. Or modify one of our garage plans for living quarters. You can also search for plans that have guest or in-law suites as part of the main house — see our In-Law/Guest Suite Plans Collection.
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Granny Pods Floor Plans

To see more house plans try our advanced floor plan search.
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Granny Pods Floor Plans

Granny Units, also called In-Law Units, usually have a small living/kitchen, bathroom, and bedroom. Our granny unit plans are separate structures. Or modify one of our garage plans for living quarters. You can also search for plans that have guest or in-law suites as part of the main house — see our In-Law/Guest Suite Plans Collection.
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Granny Pods Floor Plans

To see more house plans try our advanced floor plan search.
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Granny Pods Floor Plans

Mike B – October 26, 2010 Reply I heard a report on NPR regarding granny pods with computerized video support. I believe that the concept of the granny pod does have merit for the elder individual that is not bed bound or who requires others to assist them in daily activities. However, the “pod” as described, on your property, omits the important concept of plumbing. Where’s the water coming from? Where does the kitchen, laudry and bathroom waste go? How will these services be accomplished if not tied into the “main” house services? Regarding insurance/Medicare payment, I’ll just bet that this concept is less expensive than full time nursing houme or assisted living arrangements. Once that’s made clear, then insurance companies will jump to pay for it. They may require a “doctor’s order” but that should not be an issue. Leave a reply:  Cancel Reply
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Granny Pods Floor Plans

Mike B – October 26, 2010 Reply I heard a report on NPR regarding granny pods with computerized video support. I believe that the concept of the granny pod does have merit for the elder individual that is not bed bound or who requires others to assist them in daily activities. However, the “pod” as described, on your property, omits the important concept of plumbing. Where’s the water coming from? Where does the kitchen, laudry and bathroom waste go? How will these services be accomplished if not tied into the “main” house services? Regarding insurance/Medicare payment, I’ll just bet that this concept is less expensive than full time nursing houme or assisted living arrangements. Once that’s made clear, then insurance companies will jump to pay for it. They may require a “doctor’s order” but that should not be an issue.
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Granny Pods Floor Plans

I agree with Louise and Wil, if the bed is the primary place for the granny, there needs to be a room for an attendant. I would never leave my bedridden granny alone even with an electronic tv monitor.
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Granny Pods Floor Plans

Lou2 – May 9, 2010 Reply I agree with Louise and Wil, if the bed is the primary place for the granny, there needs to be a room for an attendant. I would never leave my bedridden granny alone even with an electronic tv monitor. Leave a reply:  Cancel Reply
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Lou2 – May 9, 2010 Reply I agree with Louise and Wil, if the bed is the primary place for the granny, there needs to be a room for an attendant. I would never leave my bedridden granny alone even with an electronic tv monitor.
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Vilynnie – October 7, 2012 Reply I was formerly one of those people who could make a judgment about a topic like this when, in fact, I knew very little about it. Until you are faced as the adult child (in my case, the ONLY adult child) trying to care for your aging and dependent parent, be open to suggestions about how they might live because, I guarantee you, they probably won’t be. They’ll leave it to you to figure it out; you will inherit their problems and have to be the problem-solver for them (and you will always be the “bad” guy). They want to stay right where they are, when it’s not practical or even safe. My dad saved as much money as he could but neglected to ever look into the true cost of elder care. Their 1950s-era house was not suitable for the aging adult; it was built for a young family. Narrow door frames, steps/stairs, large step over and down into the shower stall, etc. It got to be that they couldn’t even walk out onto the driveway to pick up their morning newspaper, step down onto the porch to pick up their mail, much less go into the garage where washing machine/clothes dryer was located, get around to the rear of the house to feed pets or water the lawn, etc. It’s a troubling progression. I was actually told by experts to walk away from my widowed mother, for the demands she put on me to care for her, based on where SHE wanted to live and, unrealistically, HOW she wanted to live. I, of course, couldn’t do it; never would. Instead, it ran me ragged traveling between two homes, hers and mine, many times per day (she had already been quite disabled for years, having many/increasing dependent needs). You have to remember when they reach old age, in this case the 80s, a lot of their friends have died or have their own frailties, neighbors have moved on, some family members (if there are any; in our case, none) have no desire to help, and won’t; maybe your parents were never associated with clubs or a church…there is simply no one to help, and they are resistant to outside help, either paid or volunteer. My mother was formerly a kind person but, out of desperation, became controlling and selfish about anyone else’s needs but her own as she struggled to hold onto her life. She has mega health problems and was very happy that I moved in with her for her first year of widowhood until I told her I simply had to get home to my husband…not to mention, my life. I’ve since reverse-mortgaged her home (for a pitiable amount, due to its dropped value in the recession) so that we have a way to pay for her since-hired, paid caregivers which were necessitated once Mom broke her back (osteoporosis, a big problem with elderly women). Believe me, I was queried/grilled (like a criminal) by the required “credit” counselors of the lender’s, as to every sort of living situation I could have come up with for Mom in order to make her savings stretch to the end of her life rather than choosing the most expensive way to live, which is in-home, 24-hr care, i.e. why we didn’t downsize Mom earlier and instead rent out her home so that she would have income; why not a move to a assisted-living community; sell our own home and move in with her; move her into our house; sell both homes and buy a home with granny quarters. Try advising a stubborn, frightened person…still in posession of her “faculties” and fighting to make her own decisions, even if they’re wrong ones…about all of her options when she refuses any and all of them, saying, “I’ll use up every last penny to stay at home til I go on the dole; then, I hope I’ll be dead because I won’t last one week in a nursing home.” Bottom line, I applaud anybody out there trying to find solutions to elder care living. I don’t think this MEDcottage is such a bad idea! Look into any and all solutions! When you are faced with trying to do the right thing for your elderly parent, when they are unwilling to do what’s right for you or your own family and unreasonable even when you try to inform them of other options to protect them and care for them, you need all the ideas and solutions you can possibly muster. It’s stressful, isolating and has taken years off of my life…we’re at five years of caregiving now for her. It’s living two lives, even with paid caregivers for her. There’s a huge amount of paperwork…payroll, accounting, bookkeeping, scheduling; a full-time job, and I already have another one. Had I been able to care for her with a tiny house or pod right off the back door of my house, just footprints away, or maybe if we could have lived in one ourselves temporarily off the back of hers, I might now be more sane, and she might have a less-dwindling bank account. My town is very rigid about granny flats, though. You are reported if you hook up a trailer in a neighborhood yard. In this recession/post-recession, I know of people living in motor homes, parked in someone’s driveway, but the authorities eventually catch on. You can only get so creative with that kind of rigidity. We become a student of our situation once it’s upon us, but sometimes it’s almost too late. We have a vast number of people reaching a certain milestone of age, formerly called “retirement years” (if anybody can still retire now!), and they are indeed the baby boomers. Some will live a long life because they’ve had a healthy one since youth (it’s been cushy for a lot of us, whereas The Greatest Generation before us knew harder times with The Great Depression, world war, etc.). Experts say most everybody who’s a boomer will be out of money before natural life is up; you save what you can, but it’s never enough. You can’t always start out gradually with elder care, getting a little bit of help as you need to pay for it. Your health can tank with one catastrophic event, completely turning your life upside down in a nano-second, leaving you with no idea what to do or how to proceed. The money for caregiving goes fast; at jet speed. Families are forced to intervene with hands-on care and when it no longer can be family care, or family/paid care as a combination, 24/7 paid care is all that’s left, and you can be spending over $100,000 per year for it, like my mother, who won’t budge from her home, simply delaying the inevitable of having to leave it once there’s nothing left to pay for caregivers. (That’s cold, hard cash; the only thing that helps her a little bit is long-term health care insurance, which will soon be finite and not renewable. Once all the savings are gone, and any investments and other insurance policies, Social Security is only a supplement, not enough income even to support the basic home expenses, and certainly not the expense of caregivers.) Be forewarned about this thru my own personal story of my mom’s situation, not to be frightened, but to PLAN. My parents had no plan. I guess they expected me to take care of them, although I’m not a trained nurse, or Dad felt he had enough money for nurses at home. Well, he did, for a couple of years, but that’s about it; THEN what? Think about your situation. Think about graduated care. Do you want to hang on to a conventional home, with yard care, housekeeping expense, etc. Someone to repair the garage door, someone to inspect the furnace, another person to pay for every little plumbing issue; it can be costly to maintain a home as it ages right along with you. These are hard decisions sometimes, but doing nothing and exploring no alternative housing options has disastrous consequences. I live it; I know it. I write out the checks for her, and my elderly parent is simply OUT of money. It’s been a sobering thing to watch go down, and I don’t know what she’d do if she didn’t have a child to be her advocate. Ironically, I have no kids, and this has been a huge wake-up call for me and my husband. Who will take care of US? For yourselves, if you are now in your 50s or 60s, look into it now, while you can make good decisions for yourself; don’t wait. Don’t discount any new ideas about elder care living, or criticize other people trying to come up with solutions! Not everybody is into it just to make a buck, but the entire subject of elder care living is starting to explode because of so many people reaching retirement age all at once; if I was young, that’s where I’d center my career, because it’s an industry which will boom, for boomers. And it’s tragic to have to be worried about your living situation and finances when you’re old and sick, when you need peace and security. Leave a reply:  Cancel Reply

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