Cake Storage Container

Cake Storage Container

So how do I store cakes?Since refrigeration is obviously out of the question, you might be wondering what your options are. Let me first introduce the best short-term options. Bake Fresh and EAT Most sponge cakes are at their prime when freshly baked, so whenever possible, bake and eat cakes the day they are made. If you are going to a bakery to get cake, check with them to see what their policy is regarding timing. Some bakeries, such as the cupcake shop at which I worked, have a very strict policy of baking cakes fresh every day. This is very labor intensive and taxing, but it also means that you’ll get the freshest, best cake possible. If the bakery from which you procure cakes bakes them ahead of time and gives them to you a day later (or, god forbid, two days later), walk away. If a bakery refrigerates sponge cakes, run away. Note: These rules do not apply to custom-decorated wedding cakes, which tend to be more labor-intensive to create and are not really about flavor anyway The best, freshest cakes are positively irresistible, so storage won’t be so much of an issue. They’ll be gone before you know it! Store at Room Temperature If you bake or buy a freshly-baked cake one night with plans to serve it the following day, you should be fine with storing it in its box, or in a sealed plastic container. If you want to be particularly diligent about keeping your cake fresh, store it in a positively airtight container. If it came in a nice cardboard box that you don’t want to undo, wrap the box in plastic wrap. If you made the cake, seal it in a plastic cake storage container. Store your cake at room temperature and keep it out of the direct sun and away from any major heat sources that might melt the icing.
cake storage container 1

Cake Storage Container

Since refrigeration is obviously out of the question, you might be wondering what your options are. Let me first introduce the best short-term options. Bake Fresh and EAT Most sponge cakes are at their prime when freshly baked, so whenever possible, bake and eat cakes the day they are made. If you are going to a bakery to get cake, check with them to see what their policy is regarding timing. Some bakeries, such as the cupcake shop at which I worked, have a very strict policy of baking cakes fresh every day. This is very labor intensive and taxing, but it also means that you’ll get the freshest, best cake possible. If the bakery from which you procure cakes bakes them ahead of time and gives them to you a day later (or, god forbid, two days later), walk away. If a bakery refrigerates sponge cakes, run away. Note: These rules do not apply to custom-decorated wedding cakes, which tend to be more labor-intensive to create and are not really about flavor anyway The best, freshest cakes are positively irresistible, so storage won’t be so much of an issue. They’ll be gone before you know it! Store at Room Temperature If you bake or buy a freshly-baked cake one night with plans to serve it the following day, you should be fine with storing it in its box, or in a sealed plastic container. If you want to be particularly diligent about keeping your cake fresh, store it in a positively airtight container. If it came in a nice cardboard box that you don’t want to undo, wrap the box in plastic wrap. If you made the cake, seal it in a plastic cake storage container. Store your cake at room temperature and keep it out of the direct sun and away from any major heat sources that might melt the icing.
cake storage container 2

Cake Storage Container

Refrigeration = DEATH!I always used to refrigerate cake, probably because we (at least in the U.S.) have been conditioned to believe that all things are kept “fresh” in the refrigerator. For many years, I believed that this was a good practice, not only because one generally puts things in the refrigerator, but also because I frequently see cakes displayed in refrigerators and refrigerated cases in many cafes and restaurants. My entire belief system was turned upside down when I had my first day of work at a famous DC cupcake shop. When I asked them how to store some of the cupcakes I was taking home at the end of the night, and suggested refrigeration in an airtight container, they looked at me like I had just proposed we cook and eat a newborn baby. This is because my coworkers and bosses took cake and cupcakes very seriously. And because refrigeration is a dreadful thing to inflict on a perfectly good cake. Why? Refrigeration dries sponge cakes out. It’s that simple. Even if you refrigerate a cake in a perfectly sealed container and only for a short amount of time, it will dry out. The only time it is appropriate to refrigerate a cake is if it has decorative buttercream icing that is literally MELTING (and in this case, appearance trumps taste) or if it is not a sponge cake and rather a cheesecake or some sort of mousse that requires refrigeration. Try to think of sponge cake like bread. After all, the two things are quite similar. Do you put your bread in the fridge? No. So don’t put your cake in the fridge either!
cake storage container 3

Cake Storage Container

I always used to refrigerate cake, probably because we (at least in the U.S.) have been conditioned to believe that all things are kept “fresh” in the refrigerator. For many years, I believed that this was a good practice, not only because one generally puts things in the refrigerator, but also because I frequently see cakes displayed in refrigerators and refrigerated cases in many cafes and restaurants. My entire belief system was turned upside down when I had my first day of work at a famous DC cupcake shop. When I asked them how to store some of the cupcakes I was taking home at the end of the night, and suggested refrigeration in an airtight container, they looked at me like I had just proposed we cook and eat a newborn baby. This is because my coworkers and bosses took cake and cupcakes very seriously. And because refrigeration is a dreadful thing to inflict on a perfectly good cake. Why? Refrigeration dries sponge cakes out. It’s that simple. Even if you refrigerate a cake in a perfectly sealed container and only for a short amount of time, it will dry out. The only time it is appropriate to refrigerate a cake is if it has decorative buttercream icing that is literally MELTING (and in this case, appearance trumps taste) or if it is not a sponge cake and rather a cheesecake or some sort of mousse that requires refrigeration. Try to think of sponge cake like bread. After all, the two things are quite similar. Do you put your bread in the fridge? No. So don’t put your cake in the fridge either!
cake storage container 4

A pie storage container will make transporting your freshly-baked goods easier and more sanitary. Choose from items of different shapes and sizes to find one that accommodates your cheesecakes, apple pies, or bundt cakes. You can also pick a cake storage container with a self-serve lid that allows customers to grab samples of your cupcakes, pastries, cookies, and scones. Read more If you operate a bakery, cafe, catering business, or diner, then a pie storage container is a great item for your business. Not only do these container and lid combos keep contents fresh, but they also protect them from outside contaminants. Business owners can use a cake storage container to store baked goods in their display case, or caterers can use them to transport items from their kitchens to off-site locations.Also make sure to check out other great items from Cal-Mil, Rubbermaid and Tablecraft.
cake storage container 5

How to I store cakes for longer periods of time?A sponge cake can be stored in a sealed, airtight container at room temperature for up to three days. I have friends who have accepted gifts of cake from me who have nommed on them for many days afterward (up to five). If you’re worried about cakes getting moldy, don’t. I’ve kept cupcakes around to see what happens to them, and they don’t grow mould. They just dry out and harden. They actually become rather cute fossils that make for excellent projectile weapons (nobody would expect a cupcake you hurl at them to be as hard as a rock, which makes your attack all the more surprising and wonderfully painful). For Long Term Storage: Freeze If you know that you want to serve a cake more than three days after its baking, seal it in an airtight container and freeze it. When you’re ready to eat it, let it slowly thaw at room temperature. Freezing helps seal the moisture in whereas refrigerating dries things out. The area of any cake that is most negatively impacted by freezing is the icing, as it does not thaw out looking as perky as it did when it was first applied. That said, freezing results in a far more tasty cake than one that has gone stale- either at room temperature or in a refrigerator.

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