Big Black Ants In Kitchen

Big Black Ants In Kitchen

What are these BIG black ants in my house? carpenter ant In early spring or late winter people often encounter these large black ants in homes. These big ants are different than the more common small, brown “nuisance ants” that plague kitchens. The big ants are called carpenter ants (Camponotus spp.) and unlike their smaller cousins, nest above ground in cavities. Nest building and cavity expansion by these large, powerful ants can cause damage if nests occur in our homes. Most of the ants you find in homes are small, less than 1/4″, and brown. There are several species of small brown ants that can nest in our home’s walls or nearby soil and enter homes in search of food and water (see House Ants for identification and control). Nuisance ants are just that, a nuisance. They won’t damage your home and pose no health threat of any kind. There’s another ant, however, that occasionally is found in homes that is much bigger (1/4″-5/8″), darker in color, nests in the walls, floors and ceiling and can cause significant structural damage if not treated properly. People’s first reaction often is “what are these BIG black ants in my home?” These are the carpenter ants and they can destroy the materials (structural wood, insulation, sheathing and so forth) that surround their nests. Thousands of dollars in home damage can be caused by a single carpenter ant nest as it grows. Winged (left) and wingless (right) carpenter ants Carpenter ants normally forage outside for food and water. Foraging ants will therefore move back and forth between their nest in a house and their hunting/foraging grounds outside. Carpenter ants are scavengers and predators taking whatever food they can find. The only time they normally enter the living space of homes is in late winter and early spring before their food sources develop outside. Therefore, if you find more than a few of these big black ants indoors, especially in spring, that’s a pretty sure sign that you have a nest somewhere in the home. Don’t be concerned about carpenter ants you find outdoors at any time of the year unless they are trailing into your home. You may also find carpenter ants with wings (see photo above). These are the so called “reproductives” that start new colonies. Since this stage can easily shed their wings the ants you find indoors may have actually flown in through an open window or door. Once you confirm the workings of a carpenter ant nest in your home (see Inspecting Homes For Carpenter Ants) plan to treat the whole house (see links below). There is no need for “periodic maintenance treatments” advocated by some pest control companies, treat only when you know for sure that there’s a problem. Use the following articles to treat carpenter ant nests around your home. If you are handy you can probably do most of this work yourself, except perhaps repair of existing damage. If you are not so handy take a look at the article below about hiring pest control services. How Carpenter Ant Colonies Start How To Control Carpenter Ant Nests Using Termidor Insecticide To Treat Carpenter Ants Hiring Pest Control Services Questions about Carpenter Ants? Contact us here. ———- Posted by Jack DeAngelis, Ph.D. at 9:26 AM Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest
big black ants in kitchen 1

Big Black Ants In Kitchen

carpenter ant In early spring or late winter people often encounter these large black ants in homes. These big ants are different than the more common small, brown “nuisance ants” that plague kitchens. The big ants are called carpenter ants (Camponotus spp.) and unlike their smaller cousins, nest above ground in cavities. Nest building and cavity expansion by these large, powerful ants can cause damage if nests occur in our homes. Most of the ants you find in homes are small, less than 1/4″, and brown. There are several species of small brown ants that can nest in our home’s walls or nearby soil and enter homes in search of food and water (see House Ants for identification and control). Nuisance ants are just that, a nuisance. They won’t damage your home and pose no health threat of any kind. There’s another ant, however, that occasionally is found in homes that is much bigger (1/4″-5/8″), darker in color, nests in the walls, floors and ceiling and can cause significant structural damage if not treated properly. People’s first reaction often is “what are these BIG black ants in my home?” These are the carpenter ants and they can destroy the materials (structural wood, insulation, sheathing and so forth) that surround their nests. Thousands of dollars in home damage can be caused by a single carpenter ant nest as it grows. Winged (left) and wingless (right) carpenter ants Carpenter ants normally forage outside for food and water. Foraging ants will therefore move back and forth between their nest in a house and their hunting/foraging grounds outside. Carpenter ants are scavengers and predators taking whatever food they can find. The only time they normally enter the living space of homes is in late winter and early spring before their food sources develop outside. Therefore, if you find more than a few of these big black ants indoors, especially in spring, that’s a pretty sure sign that you have a nest somewhere in the home. Don’t be concerned about carpenter ants you find outdoors at any time of the year unless they are trailing into your home. You may also find carpenter ants with wings (see photo above). These are the so called “reproductives” that start new colonies. Since this stage can easily shed their wings the ants you find indoors may have actually flown in through an open window or door. Once you confirm the workings of a carpenter ant nest in your home (see Inspecting Homes For Carpenter Ants) plan to treat the whole house (see links below). There is no need for “periodic maintenance treatments” advocated by some pest control companies, treat only when you know for sure that there’s a problem. Use the following articles to treat carpenter ant nests around your home. If you are handy you can probably do most of this work yourself, except perhaps repair of existing damage. If you are not so handy take a look at the article below about hiring pest control services. How Carpenter Ant Colonies Start How To Control Carpenter Ant Nests Using Termidor Insecticide To Treat Carpenter Ants Hiring Pest Control Services Questions about Carpenter Ants? Contact us here. ———-
big black ants in kitchen 2

Big Black Ants In Kitchen

Know where to look for carpenter ant activity. Though they usually nest in wood, if a carpenter ant colony is within the wall of your home, you may have a hard time finding it. If you suspect you have carpenter ants, it’s a good idea to look for them in easily-accessible places where you are likely to find them. Certain common household sites are more supportive of carpenter ant activities than others – especially if these sites are damp and/or have access to food. Look for ants in the following areas: Carpets – Check around doors, fireplaces, and other areas with easy access to the outside. Patios and foundations Areas with vegetation – Ants like to nest and forage in trails out of sight behind any vegetation, tree stumps, branches which rests against foundations, patios, etc. Pull back the vegetation to look for ants. When you find foraging ants, attempt to follow them back to their colony. Mulch and leaf litter can harbor numerous types of ants in addition to carpenter ants, such as pavement ants, fire ants, and Argentine ants. Rake mulch back from the ground to check for colonies. Floors – Potted plants, compost bends, or any other suitable item that has ground contact can contain carpenter ants.
big black ants in kitchen 3

Big Black Ants In Kitchen

Learn where carpenter ants live. Carpenter ants can (and will) establish a nest inside or outside of any type of structure, but wooden homes are especially at risk because carpenter ants like to bore tiny tunnels into wood. Unlike termites, carpenter ants don’t eat wood – they only tunnel into the structure to create a nest. Because moist wood is easier than dry wood for carpenter ants to tunnel through, the interior locations of carpenter ants will often be near a moisture source, like a leaky sink or bath. Sometimes, carpenter ants build a network of one or more satellite or parent colonies outside a structure and travel between these colonies and their foothold indoors, entering the structure through small cracks or openings. In these cases, outdoor colonies will often be located in tree stumps, landscape timbers, wood piles or other sources of damp wood. You can often locate carpenter ant trails between colonies in the early morning or early evening when the carpenter ants are foraging. There tracks are like a thin line. When carpenter ants tunnel, they can leave “frass”, a substance resembling tiny wood shavings or sawdust, behind. Frass often contains dead insects. This can provide clues to their nesting location. If you come across small piles of frass in or around your house, carefully inspect the wood nearby for tunnels – probing the suspected wood with a thin screwdriver can reveal hollow spots.

Big Black Ants In Kitchen

Big Black Ants In Kitchen
Big Black Ants In Kitchen
Big Black Ants In Kitchen

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